Friday, 9 August 2013

The Baroque Music





 







Baroque music is a style of Western art music composed from approximately 1600 to 1750.[1] This era follows the Renaissance, and was followed in turn by the Classical era. The word "baroque" comes from the Portuguese word barroco, meaning misshapen pearl,[2] a negative description of the ornate and heavily ornamented music of this period. Later, the name came to apply also to the architecture of the same period.
Baroque music forms a major portion of the "classical music" canon, being widely studied, performed, and listened to. Composers of the Baroque era include Johann Sebastian BachGeorge Frideric HandelAlessandro ScarlattiDomenico ScarlattiAntonio VivaldiGeorg Philipp TelemannJean-Baptiste LullyArcangelo CorelliFrançois CouperinDenis GaultierClaudio MonteverdiJean-Philippe RameauJohann Pachelbel, and Henry Purcell.

The Baroque period saw the creation of tonality. During the period, composers and performers used more elaborate musical ornamentation, made changes in musical notation, and developed new instrumental playing techniques. Baroque music expanded the size, range, and complexity of instrumental performance, and also established operacantataoratorioconcerto, and sonata as musical genres. Many musical terms and concepts from this era are still in use today.

The term "Baroque" is generally used by music historians to describe a broad range of styles from a wide geographic region, mostly in Europe, composed over a period of approximately 150 years.[1]
Although it was long thought that the word as a critical term was first applied to architecture, in fact it appears earlier in reference to music, in an anonymous, satirical review of the première in October 1733 of Rameau’sHippolyte et Aricie, printed in the Mercure de France in May 1734. The critic implied that the novelty in this opera was "du barocque," complaining that the music lacked coherent melody, was filled with unremitting dissonances, constantly changed key and meter, and speedily ran through every compositional device.[1]
The systematic application by historians of the term "baroque" to music of this period is a relatively recent development. In 1919, Curt Sachs became the first to apply the five characteristics of Heinrich Wölfflin’s theory of the Baroque systematically to music.[3] Critics were quick to question the attempt to transpose Wölfflin's categories to music, however, and in the second quarter of the 20th century independent attempts were made byManfred Bukofzer (in Germany and, after his immigration, in America) and by Suzanne Clercx-Lejeune (in Belgium) to use autonomous, technical analysis rather than comparative abstractions, in order to avoid the adaptation of theories based on the plastic arts and literature to music. All of these efforts resulted in appreciable disagreement about time boundaries of the period, especially concerning when it began. In English the term acquired currency only in the 1940s, in the writings of Bukofzer and Paul Henry Lang.[1]


The Baroque period is divided into three major phases: early, middle, and late. Although they overlap in time, they are conventionally dated from 1580 to 1630, from 1630 to 1680, and from 1680 to 1730.[4]

The Florentine Camerata was a group of humanists, musicians, poets and intellectuals in late Renaissance Florence who gathered under the patronage of Count Giovanni de' Bardi to discuss and guide trends in the arts, especially music and drama. In reference to music, they based their ideals on a perception of Classical (especially ancient Greek) musical drama that valued discourse and oration.[5] As such, they rejected their contemporaries' use of polyphony and instrumental music, and discussed such ancient Greek music devices asmonody, which consisted of a solo singing accompanied by a kithara.[6] The early realizations of these ideas, including Jacopo Peri's Dafne and L'Euridice, marked the beginning of opera,[7] which in turn was somewhat of a catalyst for Baroque music.[8]

Links ;

- The center of Baroque Music of  Versailles

- The Baroque Music:

- Article of Muse Baroque magazine, quarrel between French and Italian Music:

- L'espace du centre de la musique Baroque de Versailles:

- The Baroque Music on website evene:

- Website of Un site autour des concerts, events, street art, art, music, etc...

- The Baroque Music, great century day with a orchestra and animations: 




- Fews music traks of  Baroque Music:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=od7I9UE6cKg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uL6EtdH3bho

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