Friday, 4 November 2011

Few words of Contemporary Architecture






Contemporary architecture reflects a sense that everyone can draw all around him in his daily life. The architecture expresses the future of our neighbors, our land, our life, a representation, a time of beauty and fragility fray. The word evokes weak in my opinion the side and has been able to deploy the architecture of his later years, compared to solid and rugged buildings that have seen the day.








With one hand the multiplicity and diversity of materials that tend to evolve, improve, with other modern techniques of construction, with modern tools used on site, such as concrete saw and know grow (ie a short while as well), allowed the architecture, architects, to come and "flirting" with her ​​older sister, Gothic architecture, which, with the years been able to able to show us its beauty, his virtues and a different path.
The word could mingle uncertain, we could take something ephemeral for example, something that seems so fragile, beautiful, but also and here lies the contrast of this, strong, clear, almost the Corinthian order. It blends beautifully with the old architecture which, far from lightweight materials, practical and useful, this reflects another ideology, another way of life.







More constructive I say, the word may sound like small things that sum improved over time in our lives today, to change the colors to something more charming, more attractive?







The buildings speak, give through their forms escape their beauty, some thoughts and methodologies of their architects.

The sculptures, which were well represented on the monuments and old buildings, have they disappeared by the power of knowledge, through education, which managed to completely familiarize everyone with the world around him, especially the history?

Is this also due to concerns of a technical and ideological over time we have abandoned sculpture and ornamentation outside?


Read more ....

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Architecture_contemporaine

http://www.archi-guide.com/





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